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Lake Aurora by torivarn Lake Aurora by torivarn
Here comes the light.
Enjoy this aurora while we wait for the next coronal hole to be facing earth.
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:iconzynnanna:
This one i enjoyed and thank you for sharing it. The stars in the back ground with the blast of colours the green really stands out, also the one tree in the left hand corner, i like that a lot of people leave that one tree out but you didn't, the hill i like also i can see the lovely reflections in the water as colour and shows it all in the water, the cloud brings it out also dark and stormy look. Pleas keep up with your great work well done. I love colour in photos and this is what you had done.
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The Artist thought this was FAIR
4 out of 4 deviants thought this was fair.

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:iconale1712:
Ale1712 Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2012   Photographer
Wow!
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
:D
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:iconorangesaumensch:
orangesaumensch Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012
Nice colors!
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
cheers:)
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:iconmarshalllipp:
MarshallLipp Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2012  Professional Photographer
Once again amazing!
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thanks again :)
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:iconlena-knipst:
Lena-knipst Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2012   Photographer
i have never seen this before! lovely colors!
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you very much :D
Reply
:iconw-a-r-l-o-c-k:
W-a-r-l-o-c-k Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2012
Your wonderful work is featured here:[link].
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you so much, Andre :) You're too kind :)
Reply
:iconw-a-r-l-o-c-k:
W-a-r-l-o-c-k Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2012
I made it yesterday but i could not send messages to inform you, i donīt know whatīs wrong with DA but sometimes it does not work.
BTW you are very welcome.
PS: One more question, what do you do to get the milky way better out? PS?
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
I prefer using Lightroom to enhance the milky way to begin with, since Lightroom is kinder to the pixels in the capture. So I enhance the milky way itself with exposure, clarity etc and reduce the exposure, add darkness to the surrounding parts. Also known as brushing.
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:iconw-a-r-l-o-c-k:
W-a-r-l-o-c-k Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2012
Thank you so much my friend, i will try it!
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:iconzynnanna:
Zynnanna Featured By Owner Oct 21, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
this photo photo of the week well done thank you for sharing
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you, wonderwoman:)
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:iconzynnanna:
Zynnanna Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
your welcome how was your weekend wonderman
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:iconalekimoneira:
AlekimOneira Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
Great shot, as always! Such vivid colours falling from the sky... stunning!
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Glad you like it :) :boogie:
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:iconalekimoneira:
AlekimOneira Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2012
My pleasure! :aww:
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:iconimnotneko:
ImNotNeko Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I actually wanna draw with aurora background right now XD
You inspired me. :D
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you for the fine compliment :D
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:icontoni-r:
Toni-R Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
You just keep impressing me with your aurora photos!
These are perfect. :thumbsup:
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you so much for the fantastic compliment :D
Reply
:iconviramors:
ViraMors Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Beautiful :love:
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
thank you :D
Reply
:iconmeema:
Meema Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Spectacular! Awesome shot!
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Glad you like it :)
Reply
:iconjei-dinofelini:
Jei-Dinofelini Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
this is amazing!
where was that taken at?? what country????
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
This is taken in Nordreisa, Norway.

Thanks :D
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:icontrigati:
Trigati Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012
There is an online tool for predicting aurora. It is satellite data graph showing solar CME activity in near-real time, which gives about a day (depends on CME energy) of early warning, sometimes hours.

Here is an example. A good X-class CME on July 12:
[link]

Here is the latest data for comparison, October 19 (with nothing to show yet):
[link]

Unfortunately, the URL is static, so one has to type the date in the following format: YYYYMMDD. Also the text is not in English, but there are only three important letters to watch there: X, M and C - each for a CME class. The show starts with excursions into M area, and lights are fully on in the X area. Perhaps there is a more convenient tool out there, but this one is effective in predicting aurora.

There are also ULF magnetometer graphs, but they show athmospheric disturbances in real time, when plasma is already here. Still, they may give a few hours warning for the following night. Also these are dynamic links, hence can be bookmarked and auto-refreshed. There are three graphs for X, Y and Z axes. An arrival of a good flare here shows as a thick vertical band of noise:
[link]
[link]
[link]

For example, the July 12 flare graph (X axis):
[link]

Narrow vertical stripes and any horizontal bands are of no interest in this regard.

Also there is another magnetometer graph, which properly calibrated is an excellent tool for registering CME effects in real-time. A flare looks like this (same July 12):
[link]

And this is the real-time 2D graph (dynamic, can be bookmarked) for comparison, with nothing to show yet:
[link]

A strong flare sends this graph from edge to edge, one cannot miss a good flare with such warning. Good luck!
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you so much for these. However I have one question. I notice it's UTC time, but how long from when I see a spike in the graphs until they reach earth?
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:icontrigati:
Trigati Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2012
In my observation, it is usually "hours". The exact time depends on flare's energy and any number of other variables that are beyond my limited knowledge of astrophysics. :) But the basic idea is simple. Satellites detect solar flares optically. Solar light travels to Terra in about 8 minutes. But solar plasma that creates aurorae is much slower. The time difference between arrival of light and plasma is your lead time. A powerful flare (that you are most interested in) can accelerate particles (mostly protons) to enegries up to 10MeV, which translates to a proton speed of about six times slower than light. In that case, assuming real-time satellite data feed, you would get a lead time of about an hour. If proton energy is 1MeV, it is about three hours; 0.1MeV -- nine hours. But flares last for hours sometimes, and magnetic disturbances they create can last for a day or more. And the time required for plasma to actually create an aurora is unknown to me -- it has to travel along magnetic field lines to polar regions. So in the end, with all the known and unknown unknowns, in practical terms, you will get "hours" before plasma arrival. For example, in daytime you would know that the following night a light show is in order, and prepare. Also, due to ballistics, not every solar flare hits Terra.

So, let's look at a real event of March 9, 2012 -- a large magnetic disturbance: [link]
Time (UTC): ~09:00

And here is the X-ray flash reported by satellite: [link]
Time (UTC+4): ~07:30, or about UTC 04:30, which would give a warning of 4~5 hours. But the magnetic disturbance lasted until about UTC 15:00

Oh, here is NASA to help with X-ray flash detection. They have a page with current space weather conditions, even with a forecast and email alerts: [link]
And here is their fastest (1 minute) dynamic satellite data graph of X-ray flux, which is used to detect and scale solar flares (note the X-M-C-.. letter flare scale on the right): [link]
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
It's a whole science this aurorachasing, I've been following spaceweather.com and several of the norwegian radar/weather stations :) However it could burst as much as it wants for all I can do about it. We've had overcast and rain for the last week :(
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:iconsecret-ninja-super-m:
SECRET-NINJA-SUPER-M Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012   General Artist
It's lovely ^_^
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
thank you :)
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:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Best one yet :jawdrop:
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Glad you like it, mate :)
I'm sure I'll have something even more spectacular in 2 weeks time, when the earth is at the "correct" side of the sun :)
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:iconsagefillyluna:
SageFillyLuna Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Student General Artist
beautiful
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you so much :)
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:iconmgee-ad:
MGee-AD Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012
awesome....
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
cheers :D
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:iconcarminaenoctis:
CarminaEnoctis Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012
I would have guessed that the wonderful purple color here would require a longer exposure to catch, but since the greens don't seem to be washed out, maybe not?
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
It has to do with the intensity of the northernlights. If you want to capture the purpleish color it needs to have somewhat of a flare to it. And even at "short" shutterspeeds you'll get alot of purple due to the fast movement in the waves :)
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:iconcarminaenoctis:
CarminaEnoctis Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012
I'm sure these things would be more obvious if I had ever actually seen them... sigh.... If you'll allow another ignorant question... how often do you get to see them in a normal year (ie, not solar maximum). You've clearly not lost any enthusiasm for seeing them, so it just made me curious.
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
It's a good question really, I've only been photographing for a little over a year, so I'm not sure how the northernlights act when it's not solarmaximum, but I'm sure there is some sort of activity anyways :)
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:iconseelenbilder:
Seelenbilder Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
very nice shot:wow:
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
thanks :D
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:iconwnaturalism:
WNaturalism Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012
Very amazing scenery! So nice captured!!! Superb auroras colors:) Love it!
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:icontorivarn:
torivarn Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you so much :)
Reply
:iconstarfirechelle:
Starfirechelle Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Wow!! Awesome!
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October 18, 2012
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